Marketing tricks that work on us

Articles
We get sucked in by ads every day and most of the time it’s no big deal. We are consumers, and that will never change. We need to replace products that we have finished, and we are always on the lookout for products that will improve our lives. We just have to be aware of the psychology that marketing experts employ so that we don’t end up regretting impulse buys. Buy More Save More This one works on me all the time. For one thing, I hate to pay extra for shipping so if a company offers free shipping on orders over a certain amount, I am much more likely to search the site for another item to buy to get me the free shipping. The only way this really…
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Is Loyalty a type of customer behaviour?

Articles
It is a known fact that having a loyal customer base helps an organization in several ways, such as reduction in costs and an increase in profits. It’s true that a customer’s average consumption increases over time, hence bringing in more sales revenue. Also, a loyal customer base enables the organisation to cost reductions through reducing sales cycles, fast-tracking order processing, and increasing customer referrals. But, the question is, is Loyalty a type of customer behaviour? I am of the view that loyalty is a customer behaviour which is influenced by many different factors that cannot be easily identified or captured in a single satisfaction survey. For example, loyalty can be driven by: (more…)
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Marketing to teens – Five key points

Articles
You don’t need a marketing consultant to tell you that the teenager market is a big market. I have outlined five key points to be considered while you are investing your marketing dollars for the teen market. Do keep in mind that quality marketing endeavours will require time, determination, and a good budget. A good way to start is to research you own teen prospects. Once you get to know your teen prospects it will be easier to follow these five key points which will give you a head start over your competitors. (more…)
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It’s time to utilize deep customer knowledge

Articles
With the increasing use of customer relationship software some companies hold more customer information than other companies. Still, it appears to be quite rare for companies to use this information to deepen their customer relationships. I am suggesting you use micro-segmentation to help pinpoint customer preferences and styles. This will enable you to formulate a customer-value metric which will assist to identify the customers and segments that deserve the most investment. I also suggest that more attention should be paid to triggers and major life events, this will help to identify and anticipate customers' needs. Deep customer knowledge is multifaceted and requires a multifaceted approach, the trick is to integrate various forms of customer reactions and comments (of various types), transactional data and some intuition. (more…)
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Impulse buying – Boosting your bottom-line

Articles, marketing, strategy, word of mouth
Impulse buying has fascinated me for quite some time now. It is quite peculiar that most of the website and research around this topic highlights the negative impacts on consumers and none or very few people highlight how the impulse buying strategy actually can be exploited by businesses boosting their bottom-line. Promoting impulse buying behaviour The business implications are fairly obvious. If businesses wish to promote impulse buying, they should create an environment where consumers can be relieved of their negative perceptions of impulse. Businesses should stress the relative rationality of impulse buying in their advertising efforts. Similarly, they should stress the non-economic rewards of impulse buying. Additionally, businesses can make the environment more complex, further straining consumers' abilities to process information accurately. Such techniques as stocking more merchandise, creating stimulating atmospherics, and increasing…
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Buying motives – Do you know why do they buy?

Articles
Buying motives often overlap. Suppose you just purchased a new jacket. What was your dominant motive in making that purchase? Maybe you bought the jacket for comfort; you expect it to keep you warm. You might have bought it simply because it has a style or label that you're proud to wear or show your friends. Maybe you bought it because the colour makes your eyes look bluer, or it makes you look taller and thinner, or in some way it makes you feel good about yourself -- it gives you emotional satisfaction. Maybe you bought the jacket for all three reasons merged together: It's comfortable, you're proud to own it, and it makes you feel good about yourself. As a salesperson you might think that people buy your product…
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